I Make Stuff

I started in amateur radio at a young age.  I was first licensed at 14 years old in eastern Maine, and I’ve kept that same callsign.  Those were the days which had five license classes with an entry level morse code requirement.  With prompting from my elmer, I practiced the code on the air and quickly built my speed up to 20 wpm (words per minute). That allowed me to obtain the highest license of Extra Class at age 16.

I’ve lived most of my life up and down the east coast.  I’m retired from the US Navy and served as a nuclear reactor operator.  I met my wife in a small Massachusetts church back in 2010, and we ultimately decided to move to Arizona because of the awesome weather.  We have two children together, Wyatt and Veronica.

Aside from radio, politics is an integral part of my life as well.  I served as Democratic Party Chair for Springfield Ward 8 in Massachusetts from 2010 to 2012, and I’m a Precinct Committeeman for Cheatham precinct (Legislative district 27) in Arizona.

I’m currently employed as a Communications Technician for the City of Mesa, and have been doing that since I moved here.

Click the link below for my QRZ profile:

http://www.qrz.com/db/ka1tdq

 

This is the radio room aboard the USS Midway Museum in San Diego. The ship is a World War II era aircraft carrier that was commissioned just a week after the end of the war.

 

This is an unmodified, all-original ARC-5 transmitter with the cover removed. I also have the original box it came in. This one was manufactured in 1943. The ARC-5 was used extensively in World War II by the Navy and the Army. They were sold off as surplus after the war and were commonly modified for the ham bands. It’s rare nowadays to find one still in factory condition.

 

I built this 40 meter linear amplifier using three 3-500Z tubes. The YouTube video on this page shows it in action.

 

 

ARRL Amplitude Modulation Page
ARRL Amplitude Modulation Page

 

 

 

 

 

The southwest offers great locations for mobile and portable operation. This was photographed on the Gila River Indian Reservation.